Some common denominators of fire behavior on tragedy and near-miss forest fires
Read Online
Share

Some common denominators of fire behavior on tragedy and near-miss forest fires

  • 786 Want to read
  • ·
  • 80 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service in Broomall, Pa .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Forest fires -- United States

Book details:

Edition Notes

Issued Dec. 1978

Statementby Carl C. Wilson and James C. Sorenson
ContributionsSorenson, James C., joint author, United States. Forest Service
The Physical Object
Pagination31 p. :
Number of Pages31
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14840459M

Download Some common denominators of fire behavior on tragedy and near-miss forest fires

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Get this from a library! Some common denominators of fire behavior on tragedy and near-miss forest fires. [Carl C Wilson; James C Sorenson; United States. Forest Service.]. The original common denominators (Carl Wilson) There are four major common denominators of fire behavior on fatal and near-fatal fires. Such fires often occur: On relatively small fires or deceptively quiet areas of large fires. In relatively light fuels, such as grass, herbs, and light brush.   The original common denominators (Carl Wilson) There are four major common denominators of fire behavior on fatal and near-fatal fires. Such fires often occur: 1. On relatively small fires or deceptively quiet areas of large fires. 2. In relatively light fuels, such as . tragedy and near-miss incidents occur in light fuels, on small fires or on isolated sections of large fires, and that fire behavior is relatively quiet just before the incident. 21 A common assumption is the high-intensity crown fire in timber or heavy brush traps and kills firefighters.

following common denominators so that future tragedies can be prevented: Most incidents happen on smaller fires or on isolated portions of larger fires. Most fires are innocent in appearance before unexpected shifts in wind direction and/or speed results in flare-ups or extreme fire behavior.   In , Carl C. Wilson and James C. Sorenson wrote a pamphlet titled “ Some Common Denominators of Fire Behavior on Tragedy and Near-Miss Forest Fires (pdf) ”. This work forever changed the discussions about wildland firefighter safety. Dick Rothermel’s Spread Model, Behave and the Ti59 soon followed and we could model fires in the : Joint Fire Science Program. PDF | In his pioneering work on the common denominators of fire behavior associated with fatal and near-fatal wildland fires published in , Carl | Find, read and cite all the research you. There is one of the common denominators of fire behavior that contributed to this tragedy. Due to the steep slope, heavy and dry fuels, and strong winds, the fire burned up the slope at nearly 18 mph (29 km/h) and at temperatures as high as 2,° F (1,° C).File Size: KB.

Carl Wilson's Common Denominators of Fire Behavior on Tragedy Fires. There are four major common denominators of fire behavior on fatal and near-fatal fires. Such fires often occur: On relatively small fires or deceptively quiet areas of large fires. In relatively light . Severe Fire Behavior Potential Related to RH and Fuel Moisture Content. Existing References with Significant Changes Added Assets/Values at Risk to Size Up Report. Added LCES to Briefing Checklist. Revised Look Up, Down, and Around. Added Critical Burn Period to Common Denominators of Fire Behavior on Tragedy Fires. 4 Major Common Denominators of Fire Behavior on Tragedy Fires. Fatal and near fatal fires. Such fires often occur.   About forty years ago Carl Wilson, one of the early wildland fire researchers, developed his list of four “Common Denominators of Fire Behavior on Tragedy Fires”, that is, fatal and near-fatal.